07 May 2018

BY: admin

Psychology Team

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A very natural response to anxiety is to try to avoid the thing that makes us feel anxious.  For example, if being near dogs causes makes you feel anxious, then it makes sense to cross the road to avoid the dog sitting patiently at the neighbour’s gate.

Children are no different.

However there is a problem with avoidance. Yes, in the short term, it relieves anxiety. In the example above, the further you move away from the dog, the less anxiety is experienced.  However in the longer term, avoidance actually strengthens anxiety. The child who stays home from school because they are worried about a test, is only going to be anxious (or more anxious) the next time there is a test at school. And if they stay home every time there is a test, their anxiety about tests may even grow.

 What’s the alternative to avoidance?

We need to teach children how to cope with anxiety.

  • Children need to learn positive coping strategies to help manage unpleasant feelings and thoughts.
  • Parents need to model positive coping strategies. Children learn so much through observation of how their parents and peers cope with worry and stress.
  • Children need to have the opportunity to practice their coping strategies a little at a time in a supported way and experience success.
  • Children need praise when they try to beat their worries and recognition for the big steps they are taking.

When you are stuck for ideas…

There are a lot of great resources written with parents in mind that gives lots of great ideas for how to do this. A favourite of mine is “Helping Your Anxious Child” by Rapee, Wignell and Spence.  Your local library should be able to order this one in for you if they don’t have it in stock. Many online book shops sell it too.

And of course there is the Psychology Team at the Centre to help with therapeutic approaches.

Please call Tracey on 9274 7062 for more information about our services.

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